Glass Float Temari

This S9 temari was inspired by glass floats, which used to be used to keep fishing nets afloat. Many are found with barnacles attached. This one also has a starfish (or sea star) adorning it.

glass float temari 87 side 2

Side view

 

In reading about the history of glass fishing floats, they were first produced in Norway around 1840 and other countries followed, with Japan starting around 1910. Even though glass floats have been replaced by materials such as plastic and Styrofoam, many of the Japanese floats are still being found washed up on the Pacific coast.

glass float temari 87 bottom 4

Bottom view

 

Glass floats are netted then secured to fishing nets. Looking on internet, one can see several different styles of float nets. Some are simple and others more complex. There are even tutorials on how to tie a glass float net. That is how I learned to make one for this temari. The netting just happens to be a simple division, with a north and south pole.

glass float temari 87 top 3

Top view

 

The starfish was made after the ball was netted. It is made of some of my hand dyed rayon/wool felt and loosely stuffed with scraps of yarn. The surface is stitched with matt glass seed beads in a pattern that was inspired by pictures of real starfish. The red color for the starfish was also inspired real starfish.

glass float temari 87 6

Each barnacle on this temari was machine embroidered on little pieces of stabilizer.  The ends were hand stitched together to create a tube, some stitching over the join was added to disguise the seam and the bottom circles were stitched to the tube to finish the barnacle forms.

glass float temari 87 in progress 1

Next, the barnacles were pinned to the netted ball along with the starfish. After they were arranged, then each one was stitched into place. A curved needle was a necessity in order to stitch the barnacles to the ball.

glass float temari 87 5

I discovered that taking a group off the ball and pinning them to my work surface in the same order helped me to keep them in order and out of the way while stitching each one on. I left all the other barnacle clusters pinned to the ball while working on a group.

This was a good project to finish up on a snow bound day.

bird in snow

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5 thoughts on “Glass Float Temari

  1. I loved looking at all your balls today, but particularly this one. I’m so glad I checked out blog entry because we have some old Japanese glass floats from my husbands family and the netting is rotting away. Your link to how to do the netting is very helpful!!

  2. Thank you. I enjoy sharing.
    When making the netting, I found it easier to work the loops on my fingers instead of how it was shown in the tutorial. I would make a couple loops on my finger, then when I had too many on finger, I would drop the first one or two. Using this method made it a little easier for me to get more consistent loop sizes too.
    There are a few different styles, so you might want to take a look at the others on internet too. I hope you have fun learning how to make the netting for the floats.

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